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World Thinking Day History

Thinking Day was first created in 1926 at the fourth Girl Guide/Girl Scout International Conference held at Girl Scouts of the USA's Camp Edith Macy (now called Edith Macy Conference Center). Conference attendees decided that there should be a special day for Girl Scouts and Girl Guides from around the world to "think" of each other and give thanks and appreciation to their "sister" Girl Scouts. The delegates chose February 22 as the date for Thinking Day because it was the mutual birthday of Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scout movement, and his wife, Olave, who served as World Chief Guide.

In 1932, at the seventh World Conference, held in Poland, a Belgian delegate suggested that since birthdays usually involve presents, girls could show their appreciation and friendship on Thinking Day not only by extending warm wishes but by offering a voluntary contribution to the World Association. This is how the World Association's Thinking Day Fund began. The fund helps offer Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting to more girls and young women worldwide. Girl Scouts of the USA, through its Juliette Low World Friendship Fund contributes to the World Thinking Day Fund.

To emphasize the global aspect of Thinking Day, members at the 30th World Conference, held in Ireland in 1999, changed the name from Thinking Day to World Thinking Day.

See our World Thinking Day tour featuring photographs, craft ideas, songs and games from Girl Scouts/Girl Guides around the world. World Association members are invited to submit information, photos and activities to globalgirlscouting@girlscouts.org.

World Thinking Day Tour

Australia

Guiding began in Australia in 1911 and by 1918, each state had its own organization and headquarters. In 1928, the Girl Guides Association of Australia became a founding member of WAGGGS. The Association was incorporated in 1980. The name, program philosophy and training system were revamped after a 1994 review, and the new name, Guides Australia, was registered in 1996. Girls isolated from active units participate in Lone Guiding. Their unit meeting is in the form of a circular letter, audio-tape or via e-mail, and program materials are sent regularly to Patrol Leaders. Lone gatherings and camps give members an opportunity to meet each other.

World Thinking Day Tour

Brazil

Guiding started in Brazil in 1919 when Olave, Lady Baden-Powell, sent a letter to Adele Lynch, her friend who was living in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, at the time. In the letter, Lady Baden-Powell encouraged Adele to implement the Girl Guide movement in Brazil. The Guide Federation of Brazil, formed in 1930, became the first South American member association of WAGGGS.

The Brazilian uniform is dark blue, with a canvas shirt and skirt and a scarf in the branch color.

World Thinking Day Tour

Cambodia

Girl Guiding was introduced to Cambodia before 1953 but was banned during the Independence, Khymer Republic and Vietnamese Occupation. After the Paris Peace Agreement in 1991, the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, through former Guides from Europe and the Asia Pacific Region, proposed to revive the Movement. Six years later, Mrs. Leang Meng Ho, the director of the Cambodian Institute of Human Rights (and a former Cambodian Girl Guide of France) re-initiated the Movement with 16 university students. In 1999, Queen Norodom Monineat Sihanouk became Patron of the GGAC.

World Thinking Day Tour

Canada

Since 1962, Girl Guides of Canada—Guides du Canada has had special agreements in place with French-speaking Canadian Guides, now known as Guides franco-canadiennes. This French affiliate has its own distinct program and branches and has as its purpose " to help French-speaking Canadian girls and women to grow morally, intellectually, spiritually, socially, and physically, according to the principles and methods established by the Founder of Girl Guides, Lord Baden-Powell." Members of Guides franco-canadiennes are members of Girl Guides of Canada and are present in five provinces (Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia).

World Thinking Day Tour

Chile

Chile's first Girl Guide company began in Rancagua in 1913 and registered with the Scout Association of Chile. Brownie, Guide and Ranger companies were set up throughout the country, and activities were mostly carried out in schools with teachers as leaders. In 1953, the Guides formed the Asociacion de Guias de Chile, now officially recognized as a national institution of Chile. The Guides and the Scout Movement, which also had many girl members, formed the Asociacion de Guias y Scouts de Chile, now one of the country's most important youth organizations.

World Thinking Day Tour

Costa Rica

Beginning in San Jose in 1922, Guiding in Costa Rica quickly spread and the Asociación de Guías de Costa Rica was established in 1944. After a 1977 merger with the Boy Scout Association of Costa Rica, the program was divided into five main areas: social, physical, character, spiritual, and mental development, and has been developed to suit all age groups and interests. Particular attention is paid to meeting the special needs of girls in rural areas.

World Thinking Day Tour

Costa Rica

Guides in Costa Rica help in orphanages and hospitals, carry out projects with the disabled, organize Christmas parties for the underprivileged, and take part in a national parks project. The Association is involved in a literacy project and is engaged in an ongoing marine turtle rescue project which was initiated in 1989.

World Thinking Day Tour

Czech Republic

Guiding started in Bohemia, part of the Austrian Empire, in 1915. After the country's independence in 1918, the Czecho-Slovak Boy Scout Association, which included Guides, was established and became a founding member of WAGGGS. Scouting and Guiding were banned three times in Czech history: in 1940 by the Nazis, and then again in 1950 and 1970. In 1989, with the establishment of a democracy, the National Association of Scouts and Guides was again recognized. After the country split into the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic in 1993, WAGGGS recognized the separate associations for the two republics. Guiding in the Czech Republic focuses on the development of the individual and service. Camps, the highlight of the Guide year, last two or three weeks.

World Thinking Day Tour

Denmark

The Danish Guide and Scout Association is one of four component associations of The Joint Committee of Girl Guides in Denmark, which is a founding member of WAGGGS.

The association, which is open to girls and boys, launched in 1973 when the Det Danske Pigesjderkorps (Guides) and Det Danske Spejderkorps (Scouts) merged. Of the 32,300 members in 1999, 15,667 were girls.

World Thinking Day Tour

Arab Republic of Egypt

Guiding in Egypt, introduced in 1913, is designed to meet the needs of Egyptian girls and to provide service to the country. Guides takes part in hygiene, first aid, literacy and family planning campaigns. Rural camps give Guides the opportunity to work with local people and participate in welfare projects such as opening nurseries and caring for families in need. Guide and Scout units attached to colleges and universities bring health education to rural localities as part of a national immunization campaign. Environmental projects include planting new trees and projects to decrease the use of water and electricity.

World Thinking Day Tour

Finland

Finland's first Girl Guide company was formed in 1910, but then political upheaval led to a ban on Girl Guiding. The Movement was revived in 1917, and interest in the Movement grew fast. Before long there were five Girl Guide Associations in Finland. In 1943 a single Association, the Union of Finnish Girl Guides, was established. The Union of Finnish Girl Guides worked in co-operation with the Scout Union of Finland, and in 1972 the merged organization, The Guides and Scouts of Finland, was formed. The GSF has 75,000 members (Guides and Scouts). An internal migration in Finland has created a need to found new local groups in areas where there are high numbers of young people.

World Thinking Day Tour

Germany

The Union of German Girl Guide Associations has three component associations: Bund der Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (BdP) (Association of Girl Guides and Boy Scouts); Verband Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (VCP) (Christian Girl Guide and Boy Scout Association); and Pfadfinderinnenschaft Sankt Georg (PSG) (Girl Guide Association of St. George).

World Thinking Day Tour

Germany

The Union of German Girl Guide Associations has three component associations: Bund der Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (BdP) (Association of Girl Guides and Boy Scouts); Verband Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (VCP) (Christian Girl Guide and Boy Scout Association); and Pfadfinderinnenschaft Sankt Georg (PSG) (Girl Guide Association of St. George).

World Thinking Day Tour

Germany

The Union of German Girl Guide Associations has three component associations: Bund der Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (BdP) (Association of Girl Guides and Boy Scouts); Verband Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (VCP) (Christian Girl Guide and Boy Scout Association); and Pfadfinderinnenschaft Sankt Georg (PSG) (Girl Guide Association of St. George).

World Thinking Day Tour

Germany

The Union of German Girl Guide Associations has three component associations: Bund der Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (BdP) (Association of Girl Guides and Boy Scouts); Verband Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (VCP) (Christian Girl Guide and Boy Scout Association); and Pfadfinderinnenschaft Sankt Georg (PSG) (Girl Guide Association of St. George).

World Thinking Day Tour

Ghana

Guiding in Ghana began in Accra in 1921 and spread throughout the country during the next two decades. In 1930 the Association’s headquarters were built in Accra, and since 1945 cadet companies have been established in most of the women's training colleges. In 1987, the Junior (Brownie) Guides were created following the age groupings in the new national education system, and the first group of the Huhuwa Guides, ages 6-7, also came into being. The Ghana Girl Guides Association has maintained links with Scottish Guides, British Guides, and the Danish Guide and Scouts Association.

World Thinking Day Tour

Hong Kong

Membership in the Hong Kong Girl Guides Association increased steadily until 1919, but suffered a major setback during Word War II when Guiding activities were outlawed. Members continued to meet, however, and kept the spirit of Guiding alive.

World Thinking Day Tour

Hong Kong

Membership in the Hong Kong Girl Guides Association increased steadily until 1919, but suffered a major setback during Word War II when Guiding activities were outlawed. Members continued to meet, however, and kept the spirit of Guiding alive.

World Thinking Day Tour

India

Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting was introduced in India in 1911. In 1951, after India became a Republic, the Bharat Scouts and Guides (Bharat is the ancient name for India) was formed. Guiding, which exists in all States, and in both rural and urban areas, is based on community service and development. At frequent national and regional camps, members join together, regardless of caste, creed, nationality or faith, to create a feeling of national integration and stress unity in diversity. All Faiths Prayer meeting is a unique feature of the Bharat Scouts and Guides. Sangam, one of the four World Centres, is in India, so many girls meet Girls Scouts and Girl Guides from around the world.

World Thinking Day Tour

Ireland

The Irish Girl Guides and the Catholic Guides of Ireland are the two component associations of the Council of Irish Guiding Associations. Girl Guiding was first introduced to Ireland in 1911. In 1993, the Council of Irish Guiding Associations was ratified as a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, and was recognized as continuing the full membership gained by the Irish Girl Guides in 1932. As of 1997, the Council of Irish Guiding Associations' membership reached 17,012 and served 1.17% of the female population.

World Thinking Day Tour

Ireland

The Irish Girl Guides and the Catholic Guides of Ireland are the two component associations of the Council of Irish Guiding Associations. Girl Guiding was first introduced to Ireland in 1911. In 1993, the Council of Irish Guiding Associations was ratified as a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, and was recognized as continuing the full membership gained by the Irish Girl Guides in 1932. As of 1997, the Council of Irish Guiding Associations' membership reached 17,012 and served 1.17% of the female population.

World Thinking Day Tour

Ireland

The Irish Girl Guides and the Catholic Guides of Ireland are the two component associations of the Council of Irish Guiding Associations. Girl Guiding was first introduced to Ireland in 1911. In 1993, the Council of Irish Guiding Associations was ratified as a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, and was recognized as continuing the full membership gained by the Irish Girl Guides in 1932. As of 1997, the Council of Irish Guiding Associations' membership reached 17,012 and served 1.17% of the female population.

World Thinking Day Tour

Italy

Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting activities began in Italy as early as 1912, but were suppressed during the 1920s and did not start again until 1944. The Federazione Italiana Guide Esploratrici was formed in 1945 to link the two existing Associations of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. Community service is an important aspect of the association's activities; and a national program has been developed to ensure that all members are ready to help in case of emergency. Every year, regional and district camps are held for learning skills on pioneering, nature and new communication techniques. Girl Scouts also have a chance to learn new skills at the Tecnicamp or work on peace and understanding at the Eirene.

World Thinking Day Tour

Japan

A British teacher, Muriel Greenstreet, first introduced Guiding to Japan in 1919. The movement spread gradually and in 1928 it became a founding member of WAGGGS. Girl Scouting was banned by the Japanese Government during the World War II, but its spirit did not die and it was restored in 1947. Community projects undertaken by the Girl Scouts of Japan focus largely on the environment, especially on Girl Scout Day (May 22). The Girl Scouts of Japan also partake in many cultural exchange programs with other countries, including Korea and Great Britain.

World Thinking Day Tour

Kenya

Guiding began in Kenya in 1920, but was originally confined to schools attended by European girls. In 1936 the first Guide Company for African girls was introduced and since then Girl Guiding has gained in strength and attained full WAGGGS membership in 1975. Girl Guides in Kenya mainly undertake work within the community, establishing projects in health and nutrition, peace education and child rights, and an HIV/AIDS Prevention Peer Education Program. Camping is a favorite activity where girls are taught mountaineering and canoeing while also learning about conservation and the importance of the environment by planting trees and conducting anti-litter campaigns.

World Thinking Day Tour

Kuwait

Although Guiding in Kuwait began in 1957 on a limited basis, it wasn't until 1960 that a strengthened and improved program spread to most of the schools in the country. The Kuwait Girl Guides Association was established in 1965 and became a full member of WAGGGS in 1969. In 1975, it came under the supervision of the Ministry of Education as it is today. Girl Guiding in Kuwait offers young girls an opportunity for leadership and self-sufficiency. Camping is a popular pastime, with conservation a key focus of the program.

World Thinking Day Tour

Lebanon

The first Girl Guide movement in Lebanon, created in 1937, was called the Association des Guides du Liban. In 1957, a second guiding organization, the Association des Eclaireuses du Liban, was established. The two merged in 1961. Guiding suffered as a result of the fighting in Lebanon between 1975 and 1990; it was impossible to plan regular activities and the headquarters were destroyed. Despite this, the organization continued and raised enough money for a new location. Service projects within the community are particularly geared to helping refugees, the disabled and underprivileged children.

World Thinking Day Tour

Madagascar

The Federation of Girl Scouting in Madagascar is an umbrella organization for three separate Girl Scouting movements - the Fanilon'i Madagasikara, which was established to cater for the needs of Catholic girls; the Mpanazava eto Madagasikara, which was set up for Protestant girls; and the Kiadin’ny Madagasikar, a non-denominational movement. All three associations place an emphasis on working in the community. For example, they run projects on health and hygiene for mothers and children and clean and maintain roadways and public buildings, to name just two projects.

World Thinking Day Tour

Malaysia

Guiding in Malaysia has gathered momentum since it was first introduced in 1916 and has since become one of the leading movements in the country. Persatuan Pandu Puteri, Malaysia has gained particular recognition for its contribution towards unifying the various racial groups in the country's multiracial society.

World Thinking Day Tour

Maldives

The Guide Movement was introduced in the Maldives in 1962 by the Principal of Aminiya School, who was the first Sri Lanka Chief Commissioner in the Sri Lankan Girl Guide Association. By 1984, Guiding had been introduced into private schools and there were camps and leadership training on the islands. Packs/companies are organized in 58 schools and there are two Open Service Guide Companies attached to the Association. Guide companies in Maldives are involved in service projects of all kinds, such as first aid during national events, visiting local hospitals, and tree plantation. Every year during pack holidays and camps, children visit nearby islands and participate in environmental education and clean-up activities and carry out proficiency badge requirement tests.

World Thinking Day Tour

Malta

Guiding was first introduced to Malta in 1918 with the formation of companies of British Girl Guides. A separate division of Maltese Girl Guides formed in 1927, and the two merged in 1938. Malta became a full member of WAGGGS in 1972, and by 1978 all companies of British Guides had disbanded. Today, groups of Girl Guides regularly meet at Island Rallies and camp, where the focus is on nature study and respect for the environment. Other activities include fostering a sense of citizenship by developing an interest in traditional arts and customs, and working with the wider community.

World Thinking Day Tour

Mexico

Girl Guiding began in Mexico in 1930, but the country didn't become a full WAGGGS member until 1957. The program followed by Guides in Mexico has a strong emphasis on international education and ecology - girls are involved in a national project to combat environmental pollution. Girls are also involved in many local service projects, including helping in orphanages and homes for the elderly. Girls also attend national camps held every year - one year for Guides and Intermediate Guides, the next for Rangers and leaders. Mexico is also home to Our Cabana - one of the WAGGGS World Centers.

World Thinking Day Tour

The Netherlands

After World War II, two Guiding associations were active in the Netherlands, Het Nederlandse Padvindsters Gilde and De Nederlandse Gidsen. A joint council, the Nationale Padvindsters Raad, represented these two associations in the World Association. In 1967, the Federation Scouting Nederland was formed as a result of the growing cooperation between the Nationale Padvindsters Raad and the Scouting Association for boys. Since 1973, one organization has existed for girls and boys, Scouting Nederland, which combines elements from all former associations.

World Thinking Day Tour

New Zealand

Girl Scouting/Guiding in New Zealand started in 1908 with formation of the Girl Peace Scouts, which in 1923 incorporated as a Guide association. In 1928, Guides New Zealand became a founding member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. Guides New Zealand cooperates closely with other youth organizations, particularly Scouting New Zealand, and government agencies like the Ministry of Youth Affairs. To ensure that young peoples' views are heard, the organization's policy states that every national committee should have at least one member under the age of 30.

World Thinking Day Tour

New Zealand

Girl Scouting/Guiding in New Zealand started in 1908 with formation of the Girl Peace Scouts, which in 1923 incorporated as a Guide association. In 1928, Guides New Zealand became a founding member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. Guides New Zealand cooperates closely with other youth organizations, particularly Scouting New Zealand, and government agencies like the Ministry of Youth Affairs. To ensure that young peoples' views are heard, the organization's policy states that every national committee should have at least one member under the age of 30.

World Thinking Day Tour

New Zealand

Girl Scouting/Guiding in New Zealand started in 1908 with formation of the Girl Peace Scouts, which in 1923 incorporated as a Guide association. In 1928, Guides New Zealand became a founding member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. Guides New Zealand cooperates closely with other youth organizations, particularly Scouting New Zealand, and government agencies like the Ministry of Youth Affairs. To ensure that young peoples' views are heard, the organization's policy states that every national committee should have at least one member under the age of 30.

World Thinking Day Tour

Norway

The Joint Committee of Girl Guides in Norway has two component associations: Norges Speiderforbund (the Norwegian Guide and Scout Association) and Norges KFUK-Speidere (YWCA Guides of Norway).

Active guides existed in Norway before World War I. The oldest companies have records dating from 1912, although it was not until 1920 that the first national organization, Norges KFUK-Speidere, began. Norsk Speiderpikeforbund (Norwegian Girl Guides Association) debuted a year later.

World Thinking Day Tour

The Philippines

Although Girl Scouting in the Philippines began in 1918, it was not until 1939 that the movement formally launched after founder Josefa Llanes Escoda's arrival from an intensive Girl Scout training in the United States. Girl Scouts of the Philippines co-operates with UNICEF, Boy Scouts of the Philippines, Council for the Welfare of Children, National Council of Women of the Philippines, National Youth Commission, and other non-governmental organizations.

World Thinking Day Tour

Poland

After the Red Army and the Polish Army advanced into Polish territory in 1944, the new communist regime gradually emerged and Guiding became increasingly difficult to practice. Finally, in 1950, political pressure forced ZHP to suspend operations and resign from the World Association. An organization for children - with a few elements taken from Guiding and Scouting—was organized in schools. Its name was Scout and Guide Organization, not Pioneer, as in other Central and Eastern European countries.

World Thinking Day Tour

South Korea

Girl Scouting in Korea, which began in 1946, temporarily halted in 1950 as a result of the Korean War. Since 1977, Girl Scouts of Korea has had extension troops operating for girls with special needs; the organization established a Disabled Supporting Fund in 1988. Girl Scouts of Korea works with the National Council of Youth Organizations and actively cooperates with the Boys Scouts Association of Korea, UNESCO, and the YMCA.

World Thinking Day Tour

South Korea

Girl Scouting in Korea, which began in 1946, temporarily halted in 1950 as a result of the Korean War. Since 1977, Girl Scouts of Korea has had extension troops operating for girls with special needs; the organization established a Disabled Supporting Fund in 1988. Girl Scouts of Korea works with the National Council of Youth Organizations and actively cooperates with the Boys Scouts Association of Korea, UNESCO, and the YMCA.

World Thinking Day Tour

Switzerland

Between 1913 and 1916, nine groups of Girl Scouts formed independently in different parts of Switzerland. These groups joined together in 1919 to form the Swiss Guide Federation (Féderation des Eclaireuses Suisses). In 1987, the Swiss Guide Federation merged with its Boy Scout counterpart, the Swiss Scout Federation (Féderation des Eclaireurs Suisses), becoming the Swiss Guide and Scout Movement.

Today, service is a prominent activity in all age groups, with Ranger/Rover activities based mainly on it and the study of social problems. Many leaders in Switzerland are young - between the ages of 17 and 30.

World Thinking Day Tour

Taiwan

Formation of the first Chinese Girl Scout troop took place in Shanghai in 1919. At that time, the organization was known as the Boy Scouts of China and no independent section for Girl Scouts existed. During World War II, the Girl Scouts performed outstanding service in hospitals and schools.

When the political situation changed, the association was moved from mainland China to Taiwan along with the government. The need for a single organization geared towards girls became clear and the Girl Scouts Association of Taiwan formally launched in 1958.

World Thinking Day Tour

Thailand

The Girl Guides Association of Thailand was formally registered in 1958, a year after Thai Girl Guiding began. Its headquarters in Bangkok, which opened in 1967, consists of an administrative block with adjoining hostel and provides facilities for visiting association members, guest rooms, a cafeteria, a Guide shop, a swimming pool, a sauna, and training facilities where courses are run for girls and young women.

World Thinking Day Tour

Thailand

The Girl Guides Association of Thailand was formally registered in 1958, a year after Thai Girl Guiding began. Its headquarters in Bangkok, which opened in 1967, consists of an administrative block with adjoining hostel and provides facilities for visiting association members, guest rooms, a cafeteria, a Guide shop, a swimming pool, a sauna, and training facilities where courses are run for girls and young women.

World Thinking Day Tour

Thailand

The Girl Guides Association of Thailand was formally registered in 1958, a year after Thai Girl Guiding began. Its headquarters in Bangkok, which opened in 1967, consists of an administrative block with adjoining hostel and provides facilities for visiting association members, guest rooms, a cafeteria, a Guide shop, a swimming pool, a sauna, and training facilities where courses are run for girls and young women.

World Thinking Day Tour

United Arab Emirates

Guiding first started in UAE in 1973, in the Emirate of Sharjah, and since has spread to all seven Emirates. The Girl Guiding Association was registered with the government in 1979. It has since reached all education sectors and is now extended to rural areas. Girl Guiding is held in high esteem by both the public and the government. While it is only recently that overnight camping has been permitted, community service has always been a major part of Girl Guiding. Projects include entertaining patients in hospitals and visiting rural areas to instruct women in health care.

World Thinking Day Tour

United Kingdom

The Guide Association, officially recognized in 1910, has members in the six regions of England and in the countries of Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. It also has British members in more than 40 countries overseas, and represents a number of branch associations throughout the world.

World Thinking Day Tour

United States of America

Girl Scouts in the United States celebrate World Thinking Day in many different ways. Some troops choose to learn about another WAGGGS member country. They often learn about the language, clothing and food from that country and hold events to teach others in the community about the country they are highlighting.

Girls in the USA often send World Thinking Day cards or e-mails with their best wishes to their friends around the world.

World Thinking Day Tour

Zambia

Guiding began in Zambia in 1924 in Livingstone, the capital of what was then Northern Rhodesia. In 1966 the first Zambian Chief Commissioner was appointed and new headquarters were opened in Lusaka. Guides work in the Meheba Refugee settlement in northwest Zambia, focusing on skills training and income-generating activities — including as literacy, bookkeeping, dressmaking and gardening — for refugee girls. The association also runs a tree-planting project focusing on forest conservation. Work is also carried out with the United Nations, especially through UNICEF and UNESCO.

World Thinking Day Tour

Zimbabwe

Guiding in Zimbabwe began in 1912. The Wayfarers, an organization for African girls working along similar lines to the Guide Movement, began in 1926. In 1940, the two movements started to merge; this process was completed in 1950.

The name of the association changed in 1981 from the Girl Guides Association of Rhodesia to the Girl Guides Association of Zimbabwe.

World Thinking Day Tour

Zimbabwe

Guiding in Zimbabwe began in 1912. The Wayfarers, an organization for African girls working along similar lines to the Guide Movement, began in 1926. In 1940, the two movements started to merge; this process was completed in 1950.

The name of the association changed in 1981 from the Girl Guides Association of Rhodesia to the Girl Guides Association of Zimbabwe.